Tag Archives: business

Simplicity Lessons from Kidtrepreneur Clara Isabel Logsdon

by Kelvin Belfon

Clara-Isabel-Logsdon

 

Meet Clara Isabel Logsdon. She’s a 9 year-old girl who resides in Franklin, TN. There’s no doubt, she’s the youngest businesswoman I have met.

Clara was introduced to me in a recent Coaching With Excellence workshop I attended hosted by Dan Miller. During the orientation, she stood up to promote the muffins she had for sale. Although her mother was nearby, speaking before a group of over 40 adults seemed to be a usual practice for her.

This kidtrepreneur is sharp on her math skills. She’s creative and has a gregarious personality. She’s both an excellent baker and talented artist with the paintbrush; and with those two skills, she’s learned how to earn income for herself.

Clara is an unschooler. Ashley, her mother and I had a fascinating discussion on the subject. If you wish to learn more about unschooling, check out Ashley’s MamaSaysNamaste blog or ZenHabits Unschooling by Leo Babauta.

On the last day of our training, I bought Clara’s book and greeting cards. The cards were 1 for a $1.00 or 12 for $10.00. So I got the bundle deal. What happened next was totally unexpected.

Then the young author and businesswoman asked me, “Would you like me to sign your book?”

“Sure,” I replied. How could I object?

Later, I waited in line to get a picture with Clara. When the moment was right, I asked her following questions. I hope her responses will be as enlightening to you as they were to me:

 Clara-Isabel-Me

How did you start selling books?

Paraphrased: Well, actually, I started selling muffins. Then I did greeting cards because it makes more money. Then I wrote the book with my grandma Yia-Yia (Joanne Miller).

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Paraphrased: I want to be an actress. I like acting. I make my own movies on iMovies and edit them. I like painting with watercolors, illustrating pictures for books and creating stuff. I also like creating images on canva.com and putting stuff on my website.

Oh, you have your own website?!

Paraphrased: Yes, I do. My 6 year-old sister, Ellie Rose has one too but not Juliet because she’s too little…she’s only 3!

What-If-It-Were-Possible

After my quick interview with Clara, I walked away challenged and inspired all at the same time. Out of the handful of speakers and new friends I met at that two-day conference, it is quite possible that I learned the most from little Clara. She has forced me to take an honest look back on my journey.

You see, children are sages. They teach us truths that we have either become too busy or too complicated to see. If you have little ones or care for them, you know what I mean.

The biggest lesson I learned was to be child-like in your attitude towards life. Clara’s book title, “What If It Were Possible?” says it all. Dream big. Use your imagination. Set no limits to your creativity. Be bold, fearless and productive without worrying about perfection.

Helpful Notes 

  • Need a motivation with your decluttring projects or with simplifying your life? I’ll be launching a Simplicity Coaching Program. Stay tuned!
  • Lastly, would you like a FREE copy of Clara’s book, “What If It Were Possible?” or her original set of twelve greeting cards? Simply leave a comment below. The book will be the first drawing, then the greeting cards. Winners will be announced on May 24th and contacted via email. Only US shipping, please. Thanks.

Thank you for reading! If you enjoyed this post, please subscribe to Going Uncomplicated, comment below or join me on Facebook.

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How to Respond to Rejection

by Kelvin Belfon

How-Respond-Rejection-Job

Thank you for your interest… After reviewing your application, we regret to inform you…

Have you ever received a letter containing those dreadful words?

Well, I have, multiple times. They don’t ever seem to go away and last week after I retrieved my mail, I was reminded of the empty feeling those words leave. It cuts like a dagger to know that something you so anticipated would be a reality, something you had already began to mentally arrange life to accommodate, would not be after all.

There’s a certain natural progression that takes place within the first paragraph of these kinds of letters. First, emotionlessness, then disappointment, then discouragement, and sometimes even depression. Somehow, I’m even programmed to stop reading once my eyes glances those awful trigger words.

Do you know what I mean?

We regret to inform you….

Really?

Over the years I’ve discovered that my response to these letters and rejection in general has changed. I no longer feel inferior or emotional after reading those words.

You see, we all desire acceptance. It’s a basic human need. So rejection is never easy to concede no matter how many times we’ve been declined. Some gut reaction to rejection is to be expected. The secret lies in controlling that response. It’s the only way to help make swallowing the pill much more bearable.

 

How to Respond to Rejection

The first rejection isn’t the final answer. A denial doesn’t mean a closed door. Try again. Write another letter. Make an appeal. Make a phone call. Try somewhere else. Speak with another person, if necessary to a manager. Be persistent, creative, and tenacious. Ask questions and find another way to make things happen. Elbert Hubbard said, “A little more persistence, a little more effort, and what seemed hopeless failure may turn to glorious success.”

Use the rejection as an opportunity to improve. When someone says no, if possible, find out the specifics of why. Then use the feedback to learn, grow and become better. When I was 21, an online professor said he couldn’t read my handwriting for an assignment. The note was a blow to my ego. But after my pity-party, I did something about it. You see, as I went through school in my country, typing classes weren’t offered. So, I bought a “Learn to Type” program at the local office supply store and got to work on it. I learned and the rest is history.

Don’t take the rejection personal. There are multiple reasons why a position is not offered to you. Some companies have their “man” already lined up before the job posting. There could be too many qualified applicants in the pool for the same position. Whatever the reason, the decision may have nothing to do with your personality, intellect or skills. Everyone is not out to sabotage you. Be kind to yourself and avoid an unhealthy self-judgment or criticism. Clear your mind from feelings of unworthiness and move on.

The rejection is their loss, not yours. Resumes, applications and even interviews don’t always capture a person’s true potentials. Even more, committees sometimes have so many applications to comb through that they end up streamlining their review to a few keywords that they’ve decided tells them whether the candidate they are looking for is you or not. This process is loaded with all kinds of opportunities for error because great applicants are sometimes ruled out without their awareness of it. You live with yourself and know the benefits you can bring an organization or relationship. If you are qualified but have recently received the “we regret to inform you” letter…it’s ok. It’s their loss, not yours.

Use the rejection as motivation to start your own. A “no” might be the exact word you need to hear. If you are passionate about your idea, maybe it’s time to launch your own business. You may need to have a few conversations with key people who know of important connections you need to make or critical facts you need in order to get going. Many people have used “rejection” as an opportunity to build their dreams. Why not you? Why not now?

 

little-more-persistence-Elbert-Hubbard

 

Rejection could mean not now but later. There were times when I thought, “ Kelvin, you’re ready.” But I was young and naïve. In hindsight the rejection letters only protected me. The right timing is everything. In my last semester of college, I applied to continue my education in Israel. The request wasn’t approved and I concluded that the door to Israel was forever closed. It’s been a 13-year wait till now. In just a few days, a work colleague and I will be leading a group close to 100 people on a Holy Land Tour. As I ponder what has transpired over the years since that first rejection, going to Israel is so much more meaningful now.

Be grateful for the rejection. Yes, I know it sounds crazy but a rejection might be a blessing in disguise. Some relationships, work environments or ventures are toxic and hold the potential of sucking you dry. A month ago, I was coaching a young man who was miserable in his job. The turn over in his department was outrageous. When I got off the phone, I remembered how the same position was offered to me 3 years ago. All I could think to myself was, “Yes, I’ve dodged another bullet.” Oh, if we all had a crystal ball we would be writing more thank you notes to those people or committees that reject us instead of questioning our self-worth!

It would be great to hear similar stories from you. Have you experienced rejection that ended up being a blessing in disguise?

Thank you for reading! If you enjoyed this post, please subscribe to Going Uncomplicated, comment below or join me on Facebook.

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